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The Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History pairs essays and works of art with chronologies, telling the story of art and global culture through The Met collection.

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Timeline of Art History The Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History pairs essays and works of art with chronologies, telling the story of art and global culture through The Met collection.

Audio Guide Listen to the stories behind thousands of artworks in The Met collection and select exhibitions. This cosmic mother goddess was often represented as a cow.

Hathor and Mehet-Weret were both thought of as the cow who birthed the sun god and placed him between her horns. Like Nut, Hathor was said to give birth to the sun god each dawn.

The "house" referred to may be the sky in which Horus lives, or the goddess's womb from which he, as a sun god, is born each day.

Hathor was a solar deity , a feminine counterpart to sun gods such as Horus and Ra, and was a member of the divine entourage that accompanied Ra as he sailed through the sky in his barque.

She was one of many goddesses to take the role of the Eye of Ra, a feminine personification of the disk of the sun and an extension of Ra's own power.

Ra was sometimes portrayed inside the disk, which Troy interprets as meaning that the Eye goddess was thought of as a womb from which the sun god was born.

Hathor's seemingly contradictory roles as mother, wife, and daughter of Ra reflected the daily cycle of the sun.

At sunset the god entered the body of the goddess, impregnating her and fathering the deities born from her womb at sunrise: himself and the Eye goddess, who would later give birth to him.

Ra gave rise to his daughter, the Eye goddess, who in turn gave rise to him, her son, in a cycle of constant regeneration. The Eye of Ra protected the sun god from his enemies and was often represented as a uraeus , or rearing cobra , or as a lioness.

In the funerary text known as the Book of the Heavenly Cow , Ra sends Hathor as the Eye of Ra to punish humans for plotting rebellion against his rule.

She becomes the lioness goddess Sekhmet and massacres the rebellious humans, but Ra decides to prevent her from killing all humanity.

He orders that beer be dyed red and poured out over the land. The Eye goddess drinks the beer, mistaking it for blood, and in her inebriated state reverts to being the benign and beautiful Hathor.

The Eye goddess, sometimes in the form of Hathor, rebels against Ra's control and rampages freely in a foreign land: Libya west of Egypt or Nubia to the south.

Weakened by the loss of his Eye, Ra sends another god, such as Thoth , to bring her back to him. Egyptian religion celebrated the sensory pleasures of life, believed to be among the gods' gifts to humanity.

Egyptians ate, drank, danced, and played music at their religious festivals. They perfumed the air with flowers and incense. Many of Hathor's epithets link her to celebration; she is called the mistress of music, dance, garlands, myrrh , and drunkenness.

In hymns and temple reliefs, musicians play tambourines, harps, lyres, and sistra in Hathor's honor. Sistra had erotic connotations and, by extension, alluded to the creation of new life.

These aspects of Hathor were linked with the myth of the Eye of Ra. The Eye was pacified by beer in the story of the Destruction of Mankind.

In some versions of the Distant Goddess myth, the wandering Eye's wildness abated when she was appeased with products of civilization like music, dance, and wine.

The water of the annual flooding of the Nile , colored red by sediment, was likened to wine, and to the red-dyed beer in the Destruction of Mankind.

Festivals during the inundation therefore incorporated drink, music, and dance as a way to appease the returning goddess. The noise of the celebration drives away hostile powers and ensures the goddess will remain in her joyful form as she awaits the male god of the temple, her mythological consort Montu , whose son she will bear.

Hathor's joyful, ecstatic side indicates her feminine, procreative power. In some creation myths she helped produce the world itself.

The hand he used for this act, the Hand of Atum, represented the female aspect of himself and could be personified by Hathor, Nebethetepet, or another goddess, Iusaaset.

Hathor could be the consort of many male gods, of whom Ra was only the most prominent. Mut was the usual consort of Amun , the preeminent deity during the New Kingdom who was often linked with Ra.

But Mut was rarely portrayed alongside Amun in contexts related to sex or fertility, and in those circumstances, Hathor or Isis stood at his side instead.

Hathor's sexual side was seen in some short stories. In a cryptic fragment of a Middle Kingdom story, known as "The Tale of the Herdsman", a herdsman encounters a hairy, animal-like goddess in a marsh and reacts with terror.

On another day he encounters her as a nude, alluring woman. Most Egyptologists who study this story think this woman is Hathor or a goddess like her, one who can be wild and dangerous or benign and erotic.

Thomas Schneider interprets the text as implying that between his two encounters with the goddess the herdsman has done something to pacify her.

After some time, Hathor exposes her genitals to Ra, making him laugh and get up again to perform his duties as ruler of the gods.

Life and order were thought to be dependent on Ra's activity, and the story implies that Hathor averted the disastrous consequences of his idleness.

Her act may have lifted Ra's spirits partly because it sexually aroused him, although why he laughed is not fully understood.

Hathor was praised for her beautiful hair. Egyptian literature contains allusions to a myth not clearly described in any surviving texts, in which Hathor lost a lock of hair that represented her sexual allure.

One text compares this loss with Horus's loss of his divine Eye and Set 's loss of his testicles during the struggle between the two gods, implying that the loss of Hathor's lock was as catastrophic for her as the maiming of Horus and Set was for them.

Hathor was called "mistress of love", as an extension of her sexual aspect. She destined my mistress [loved one] for me.

And she came of her own free will to see me. Hathor was considered the mother of various child deities.

As suggested by her name, she was often thought of as both Horus's mother and consort. Isis and Osiris were considered Horus's parents in the Osiris myth as far back as the late Old Kingdom, but the relationship between Horus and Hathor may be older still.

Images of the Hathor-cow with a child in a papyrus thicket represented his mythological upbringing in a secluded marsh.

Goddesses' milk was a sign of divinity and royal status. Thus, images in which Hathor nurses the pharaoh represent his right to rule.

Beginning in the Late Period — BC , temples focused on the worship of a divine family: an adult male deity, his wife, and their immature son. Satellite buildings, known as mammisis , were built in celebration of the birth of the local child deity.

The child god represented the cyclical renewal of the cosmos and an archetypal heir to the kingship.

At Dendera, the mature Horus of Edfu was the father and Hathor the mother, while their child was Ihy , a god whose name meant "sistrum-player" and who personified the jubilation associated with the instrument.

The milky sap of the sycamore tree , which the Egyptians regarded as a symbol of life, became one of her symbols. Like Meskhenet , another goddess who presided over birth, Hathor was connected with shai , the Egyptian concept of fate , particularly when she took the form of the Seven Hathors.

In two New Kingdom works of fiction, the " Tale of Two Brothers " and the " Tale of the Doomed Prince ", the Hathors appear at the births of major characters and foretell the manner of their deaths.

Hathor's maternal aspects can be compared with those of Isis and Mut, yet there are many contrasts between them.

Isis's devotion to her husband and care for their child represented a more socially acceptable form of love than Hathor's uninhibited sexuality, [61] and Mut's character was more authoritative than sexual.

Egypt maintained trade relations with the coastal cities of Syria and Canaan , particularly Byblos , placing Egyptian religion in contact with the religions of that region.

Hathor's solar character may have played a role in linking her with trade: she was believed to protect ships on the Nile and in the seas beyond Egypt, as she protected the barque of Ra in the sky.

Hathor was closely connected with the Sinai Peninsula , [72] which was not considered part of Egypt proper but was the site of Egyptian mines for copper, turquoise , and malachite during the Middle and New Kingdoms.

She was also called "Lady of Faience ", a blue-green ceramic that Egyptians likened to turquoise. South of Egypt, Hathor's influence was thought to have extended over the land of Punt , which lay along the Red Sea coast and was a major source for the incense with which Hathor was linked, as well as with Nubia, northwest of Punt.

The text describes these exotic goods as Hathor's gift to the pharaoh. Hathor was one of several goddesses believed to assist deceased souls in the afterlife.

She was often regarded as a specialized manifestation of Hathor. Just as she crossed the boundary between Egypt and foreign lands, Hathor passed through the boundary between the living and the Duat , the realm of the dead.

Because the sky goddess—either Nut or Hathor—assisted Ra in his daily rebirth, she had an important part in ancient Egyptian afterlife beliefs , according to which deceased humans were reborn like the sun god.

Nut, Hathor, and Imentet could each, in different texts, lead the deceased into a place where they would receive food and drink for eternal sustenance.

Thus, Hathor, as Imentet, often appears on tombs, welcoming the deceased person as her child into a blissful afterlife. Nut most commonly filled this role, but the tree goddess was sometimes called Hathor instead.

The afterlife also had a sexual aspect. In the Osiris myth, the murdered god Osiris was resurrected when he copulated with Isis and conceived Horus.

In solar ideology, Ra's union with the sky goddess allowed his own rebirth. Sex therefore enabled the rebirth of the deceased, and goddesses like Isis and Hathor served to rouse the deceased to new life.

But they merely stimulated the male deities' regenerative powers, rather than playing the central role. Ancient Egyptians prefixed the names of the deceased with Osiris's name to connect them with his resurrection.

For example, a woman named Henutmehyt would be dubbed "Osiris-Henutmehyt". Over time they increasingly associated the deceased with both male and female divine powers.

In the Third Intermediate Period c. In some cases, women were called "Osiris-Hathor", indicating that they benefited from the revivifying power of both deities.

In these late periods, Hathor was sometimes said to rule the afterlife as Osiris did. Hathor was often depicted as a cow bearing the sun disk between her horns, especially when shown nursing the king.

She could also appear as a woman with the head of a cow. Her most common form, however, was a woman wearing a headdress of the horns and sun disk, often with a red or turquoise sheath dress, or a dress combining both colors.

Sometimes the horns stood atop a low modius or the vulture headdress that Egyptian queens often wore in the New Kingdom. Because Isis adopted the same headdress during the New Kingdom, the two goddesses can be distinguished only if labeled in writing.

When in the role of Imentet, Hathor wore the emblem of the west upon her head instead of the horned headdress. Some animals other than cattle could represent Hathor.

The uraeus was a common motif in Egyptian art and could represent a variety of goddesses who were identified with the Eye of Ra.

She also appeared as a lioness, and this form had a similar meaning. Like other goddesses, Hathor might carry a stalk of papyrus as a staff, though she could instead hold a was staff, a symbol of power that was usually restricted to male deities.

The sistrum came in two varieties: a simple loop shape or the more complex naos sistrum, which was shaped to resemble a naos shrine and flanked by volutes resembling the antennae of the Bat emblem.

Some mirror handles were made in the shape of Hathor's face. Hathor was sometimes represented as a human face with bovine ears, seen from the front rather than in the profile-based perspective that was typical of Egyptian art.

When she appears in this form, the tresses on either side of her face often curl into loops. This mask-like face was placed on the capitals of columns beginning in the late Old Kingdom.

Columns of this style were used in many temples to Hathor and other goddesses. The designs of Hathoric columns have a complex relationship with those of sistra.

Both styles of sistrum can bear the Hathor mask on the handle, and Hathoric columns often incorporate the naos sistrum shape above the goddess's head.

Amulet of Hathor as a uraeus wearing a naos headdress, early to mid-first millennium BC. Head of Hathor with cats on her headdress, from a clapper, late second to early first millennium BC.

The Malqata Menat necklace, fourteenth century BC. During the Early Dynastic Period, Neith was the preeminent goddess at the royal court, [] while in the Fourth Dynasty, Hathor became the goddess most closely linked with the king.

Hathor was one of the few deities to receive such donations. She may have absorbed the traits of contemporary provincial goddesses.

Many female royals, though not reigning queens, held positions in the cult during the Old Kingdom. The first images of the Hathor-cow suckling the king date to his reign, and several priestesses of Hathor were depicted as though they were his wives, although he may not have actually married them.

Queens were portrayed with the headdress of Hathor beginning in the late Eighteenth Dynasty. Hatshepsut , a woman who ruled as a pharaoh in the early New Kingdom, emphasized her relationship to Hathor in a different way.

The preeminence of Amun during the New Kingdom gave greater visibility to his consort Mut, and in the course of the period, Isis began appearing in roles that traditionally belonged to Hathor alone, such as that of the goddess in the solar barque.

Despite the growing prominence of these deities, Hathor remained important, particularly in relation to fertility, sexuality, and queenship, throughout the New Kingdom.

After the New Kingdom, Isis increasingly overshadowed Hathor and other goddesses as she took on their characteristics. More temples were dedicated to Hathor than to any other Egyptian goddess.

A willow and a sycomore tree stood near the sanctuary and may have been worshipped as manifestations of the goddess. As the rulers of the Old Kingdom made an effort to develop towns in Upper and Middle Egypt , several cult centers of Hathor were founded across the region, at sites such as Cusae , Akhmim , and Naga ed-Der.

One continued to function and was periodically rebuilt as late as the Ptolemaic Period, centuries after the village was abandoned.

The last version of the temple was built in the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods and is today one of the best-preserved Egyptian temples from that time.

In the Old Kingdom, most priests of Hathor, including the highest ranks, were women. Many of these women were members of the royal family. Thus, non-royal women disappeared from the high ranks of Hathor's priesthood, [] although women continued to serve as musicians and singers in temple cults across Egypt.

The most frequent temple rite for any deity was the daily offering ritual, in which the cult image, or statue, of a deity would be clothed and given food.

Many of Hathor's annual festivals were celebrated with drinking and dancing that served a ritual purpose.

Revelers at these festivals may have aimed to reach a state of religious ecstasy , which was otherwise rare or nonexistent in ancient Egyptian religion.

Graves-Brown suggests that celebrants in Hathor's festivals aimed to reach an altered state of consciousness to allow them interact with the divine realm.

It was celebrated as early as the Middle Kingdom, but it is best known from Ptolemaic and Roman times.

Whereas the rampages of the Eye of Ra brought death to humans, the Festival of Drunkenness celebrated life, abundance, and joy.

In a local Theban festival known as the Beautiful Festival of the Valley , which began to be celebrated in the Middle Kingdom, the cult image of Amun from the Temple of Karnak visited the temples in the Theban Necropolis while members of the community went to the tombs of their deceased relatives to drink, eat, and celebrate.

Several temples in Ptolemaic times, including that of Dendera, observed the Egyptian new year with a series of ceremonies in which images of the temple deity were supposed to be revitalized by contact with the sun god.

On the days leading up to the new year, Dendera's statue of Hathor was taken to the wabet , a specialized room in the temple, and placed under a ceiling decorated with images of the sky and sun.

On the first day of the new year, the first day of the month of Thoth , the Hathor image was carried up to the roof to be bathed in genuine sunlight.

The best-documented festival focused on Hathor is another Ptolemaic celebration, the Festival of the Beautiful Reunion.

It took place over fourteen days in the month of Epiphi. The endpoint of the journey was the Temple of Horus at Edfu , where the Hathor statue from Dendera met that of Horus of Edfu and the two were placed together.

The texts say the divine couple performed offering rites for these entombed gods. Bleeker thought the Beautiful Reunion was another celebration of the return of the Distant Goddess, citing allusions in the temple's festival texts to the myth of the solar eye.

She points out that the birth of Horus and Hathor's son Ihy was celebrated at Dendera nine months after the Festival of the Beautiful Reunion, implying that Hathor's visit to Horus represented Ihy's conception.

The third month of the Egyptian calendar , Hathor or Athyr , was named for the goddess. Festivities in her honor took place throughout the month, although they are not recorded in the texts from Dendera.

Egyptian kings as early as the Old Kingdom donated goods to the temple of Baalat Gebal in Byblos, using the syncretism of Baalat with Hathor to cement their close trading relationship with Byblos.

A few artifacts from the early first millennium BC suggest that the Egyptians began equating Baalat with Isis at that time.

Its presence in the tomb suggests the Mycenaeans may have known that the Egyptians connected Hathor with the afterlife.

Egyptians in the Sinai built a few temples in the region. The largest was a complex dedicated primarily to Hathor as patroness of mining at Serabit el-Khadim , on the west side of the peninsula.

It included a shrine to Hathor that was probably deserted during the off-season. The local Midianites , whom the Egyptians used as part of the mining workforce, may have given offerings to Hathor as their overseers did.

After the Egyptians abandoned the site in the Twentieth Dynasty, however, the Midianites converted the shrine to a tent shrine devoted to their own deities.

In contrast, the Nubians in the south fully incorporated Hathor into their religion. During the New Kingdom, when most of Nubia was under Egyptian control, pharaohs dedicated several temples in Nubia to Hathor, such as those at Faras and Mirgissa.

Therefore, Hathor, Isis, Mut, and Nut were all seen as the mythological mother of each Kushite king and equated with his female relatives, such as the kandake , the Kushite queen or queen mother , who had prominent roles in Kushite religion.

Thus, in the Meroitic period of Nubian history c. In addition to formal and public rituals at temples, Egyptians privately worshipped deities for personal reasons, including at their homes.

Birth was hazardous for both mother and child in ancient Egypt, yet children were much desired. Thus fertility and safe childbirth are among the most prominent concerns in popular religion, and fertility deities such as Hathor and Taweret were commonly worshipped in household shrines.

Egyptian women squatted on bricks while giving birth, and the only known surviving birth brick from ancient Egypt is decorated with an image of a woman holding her child flanked by images of Hathor.

Hathor was one of a handful of deities, including Amun, Ptah, and Thoth, who were commonly prayed to for help with personal problems.

Most offerings to Hathor were used for their symbolism, not for their intrinsic value.

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